Amigurumi · Crochet

We Bare Squares

Story time!

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Okay, so it was near the end of my first day at the Farmer’s Market, and I was chilling at my booth. At the time, I had two square bears for sale—a brown bear and a panda. So this little kid and his mom walked up to my booth and started looking at the bears. After a minute, his mom asked, more to him than me, “Where is Ice Bear?” in reference to We Bare Bears, a cartoon featuring a grizzly bear, a panda, and a polar bear. I, of course, immediately responded by saying that I simply hadn’t made him yet. To be honest, I made the square bears before I knew We Bare Bears existed, and didn’t make the connection between the show and my bears until they pointed it out. So naturally, I decided to make a square polar bear to complete the set.

 

Now might be a good time to mention that I’ve never actually seen any episodes of We Bare Bears…. I should probably go watch some of the show, so I know what I’m talking about. Be right back.

webarebearsscreencap1webarebearsscreencap8webarebearsscreencap3webarebearsscreencap6

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All screencaps from imdb.com

………..

……………….

……………………..What the heck did I just watch? That was strangely endearing…

Yeah, so anyway, I made Ice Bear. Here’s a picture:

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Isn’t he cute?

If you want to make your own square bear, I used a pattern by Lion Brand Yarn, which you can find here. The bears are super easy to make, and if you’re new to amigurumi, it’s definitely a pattern I’d suggest checking out.

So…yeah. That’s about it. I leave you with this picture of all three square bears hanging out by the log in my backyard.

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Amigurumi · Crochet · K-Pop · Matoki · Patterns · Uncategorized

Matoki Part VII or How NOT to Write a Pattern

So it’s been, what, two months since I finished Keke? I should probably address this whole pattern nonsense. Yeah….

Okay, so, I know I’ve written a few patterns before, and generally the design process (the part where I figure out how to make the thing) is the hardest part, with the actual writing of the pattern being relatively easy. However, the matoki pattern has two things my previous patterns did not. The first is pattern pieces for the mask and several of the markings. The second is assembly instructions. Let’s address them one at a time.

The pattern pieces were relatively easy to make. I’ve been saving the paper versions of all the pieces, and it was a simple matter of scanning them into the computer and using Gimp (like Photoshop, but free and harder to use) to outline them. This was easy. And boring. So I put it off for a few weeks. But I got it done. Two weeks ago.

Writing assembly instructions, however, proved to be much harder. More specifically, I found it difficult to explain how to assemble any specific matoki without relying heavily on pictures. So I decided to add pictures. The only problem was that, while I was designing the matoki, I neglected to take pictures.

Yeah.

So, long story short, I decided to make a new set of matoki, explicitly for the purpose of taking pictures. I will be finishing one every week starting two weeks ago, and as soon as I finish each matoki, I will be posting their individual pattern to Ravelry. If you’ve been paying attention, you may have noticed that I just implied that two of the individual patterns are already on Ravelry. You would be correct. Here are links to the patterns for Shishi and Tats.

Thank you all for your patience, and for following me through this project. I’ll have one more post on this when all of the patterns are up.