Rainbow Hanging Organizers

20160827_145249I’ve spent the past week preparing for the start of my junior year of college, including moving into my new dorm room. As a chronically disorganized person, one of my goals for the semester is to keep everything off the floor and, hopefully, in it’s proper place. Which brings us to the baskets.

In an effort to keep everything organized, I went on a quest for crochet basket patterns. While there were many different options, the one that drew me in was the aptly titled “Organization Now!” (exclamation point included)
which featured a simple design and a handy hanging loop. This was exactly what I was looking for—and it wouldn’t take up valuable floor space! Excited, I set out to make one immediately like, a week later. I’m a busy person, guys.

The first thing I noticed after making one was that it was significantly smaller than I initially expected. There are no measurements or size references in the original pattern, and I was expecting something about a foot tall. Instead, the baskets are (at least in my case) about 7 inches tall and 7 inches in diameter. They’re still good for organizing small stuff, so I decided to make five more—one in eIMG_20160827_145925very color of the rainbow.

Despite their small size, they work beautifully for holding that small stuff that would otherwise have been tossed haphazardly in a drawer/box (and my coffee). They also add a splash of color to the room as a whole, which is awesome! Overall, I love this pattern, and making these was a great way to get hyped for the new school year.

If you would like to make one of these, you can find the pattern at http://www.mooglyblog.com/organization-now-crochet-basket/. You should also check out the Moogly blog in general. There’s some really cool stuff there!

Matoki Part II: Dadamato

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It took a lot longer than I expected, but I finally finished the second matoki! Dadamato was a challenge for a few reasons. First, I wanted to tighten the stitching, so the stuffing wouldn’t be visible like it is in Tatsmato. However, that made him a little too small to reasonably sew on his pattern (the tire treads that cover his body). After a few false starts, I did manage to rectify this by using the smaller hook and scaling the pattern by a factor of 1.5. This did, however, mean that I wound up rewriting the entire pattern.

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The other major problem came with the tire treads. The treads on his face and body were made by cutting and sewing white felt which, as it turns out, takes an entire day on its own. That said, I think it was worth the time, because he looks really cool.

All in all, the extra effort definitely paid off and I think the pattern is significantly better because of it. I know in the first matoki post I promised I’d post the pattern with this one. However, I’ve decided to include pattern pieces and instructions for how to make the masks/markings of each individual matoki. As such, the pattern will not be available until I’ve finished all six, so I can design the individual pieces. I’ve already started the next one, and I can’t wait for all the new challenges he presents.

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Two down—four to go

Black Widow Coasters

100_8141If you’re one of the two people who have been following this blog, you may have noticed that I like making sets of things. The lone matoki post has that ominous “Part 1” on it, and this is the third Avengers themed coaster in three months. So, yes, it’s official. I am making a set of Avengers Coasters. Yay!

This particular set came about as an exercise in pattern making. These coasters are some of the first designs I’ve ever made myself, and the first designs I have written patterns about. (Except the Captain America coasters. Those were made from someone else’s pattern.) This is as much an exercise in learning to write good patterns as it is in making small, superhero themed motifs.

That’s also why Black Widow came third instead of, say, Thor.In addition to being a bad-ass female super spy, Black Widow has a symbol that is relatively easy to fit inside a circle. Incidentally, the pattern for this coaster can be found on Ravelry, which is where I will be posting all of my patterns from now on. Usually before they end up on the blog. (Here’s the direct link to the pattern.)

So, in sum, you’re going to be seeing a lot of these over the next few months. I leave you now with a picture of the first half of the set, and hope you will bear with me while I finish the other three.

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